Route details, maps, pubs, features, local history and folklore for a wide variety of walks focusing primarily on Norfolk and Suffolk

Tuesday, 19 October 2010

Sheringham to Cromer Circular Walk

An easy 9 mile Norfolk coastal walk along beach and clifftops between Cromer and Sheringham

The North Norfolk Coast Path sticks pretty much to the coast until it reaches Sheringham. Here, because of coastal erosion, it migrates inland up through the wooded hills past the Roman Camp before returning to Cromer. However, it is still possible to walk directly between Sheringham and Cromer, both along the shoreline at low tide and also across the cliffs (apart from a small section between Cromer and East Runton where the walker has to walk along the road). The highlight of the walk is undoubtedly Beeston Bump from where you can view the full length of the coast from Cromer to Sheringham and beyond. The beauty about this section of coast is that you can start and end at any point to make a circular walk.

Sheringhamn to Cromer Walk - Essential Information

Walk Statistics:

Start point
SheringhamnView in OS Map | View in Google Map
End Point
CromerView in OS Map | View in Google Map
Total Walk distance
9 miles
Walk difficulty
Easy

Walk Data

Date of Walk
2010-10-15
Walk Time
14:00 to 18:30
Walkers
Griffmonster Kat
Weather Conditions
Blustery wind and sunny spells

Walk Notes

This section of coastline is constantly changing with the effects of coastal erosion so each year presents new scenes. Beeston Bump is a pleasure to climb and is the one thing that is immediately headed for on each visit to this area.

On this visit to the area we met an old boy who chatted to us in the cafe opposite the church - he told us he was 95 years old and when he was 20 he used to work where the cafe now stands which in them days was the Metropole hotel - he had the job of collecting baggages from the station and returning them to the hotel where he put them in the lift which was located where the entrance to the cafe now stood. Fascinating. If you ever see this chap, spare him your ear as he has a lot of worthwhile tales to tell.

Sheringham is currently being plagued by proposals to build a supermarket in the town, primarily from Tesco. This visit to the town it seemed to be a constant conversation piece within the shops - the criticism being that it will take the trade away from the town shops. I must admit that I agree with this point of view despite what Tesco may say to the contrary. Unfortunately the supermarkets now seem to have won the battle. (Save our Sheringham Blog)

I hope to update this blog page each time I revisit this walk - there are always new experiences to relate!

An old Pillbox lies sunken in the sands close to Cromer
An old Pillbox lies sunken in the sands close to Cromer

Directions

A simple circular route following clifftop paths in one direction and the beach in the other.

From Woodhill Park there is a path that runs along the cliff top, past West Runton and in front of Beeston Regis caravan site. Here it joins the official coastal footpath for the ascent up Beeston Bump. You can now follow the National Trail acorns down into Sheringham. Planning this walk right you will then be able to walk the shoreline all the way from Sheringham to Cromer. To return from Cromer follow the cliff top path to Cromer Bowls club where erosion forces the walker onto the road through to East Runton and back to where the walk starts.!

The view from Beeston Bump all the way up to Cromer
The view from Beeston Bump all the way up to Cromer

Features

Beeston Bump: View in OS Map | View in Google Map

It is most disconcerting that new building development is now encroaching upon Beeston Bump, a hideous monstrosity is now situated at the base of the bump peeking around its edge to the sea. The bump is slowly being eroded and when the day comes and the bump finally falls to the sea I will happily watch the monstrosity succumb to the same fate.

References

Sheringham Poppy Line: View in OS Map | View in Google Map

Sheringham is the terminus for the North Norfolk Railway, also known as the Poppy Line. This preserved steam railway runs the 5 miles between Sheringham and Holt along the former route of the Midland and Great Northern Joint Railway and has recently been reconnected to the National Rail network allowing steam specials to run from London and Norwich.

Work on rebuilding the line started in 1965, and on 4 June 1967, two steam locomotives were delivered. The operating company, North Norfolk Railway plc, was launched in 1965 following the granting of two Light Railway Orders. In May 1973, the railway was the scene of filming of the episode The Royal Train of the popular TV programme Dad's Army. The main restoration sheds are located at Weybourne with new carriage storage sheds more recently built near Holt with Heritage Lottery Funding.

References

Cromer Lifeboat Station: View in OS Map | View in Google Map

The current lifeboat station on the end of Cromer pier was re-built between 1997-1999 to replace the smaller older one which was re-located to Southwold in Suffolk where it is used as a lifeboat museum. There has been a lifeboat service operated from Cromer for two centuries - predating the establishment of the RNLI. The lifeboat station is open to the public and is well worth the visit.

References
On the left, Cromer through one of its little alleyways, on the right the summit of Beeston Bump On the left, Cromer through one of its little alleyways, on the right the summit of Beeston Bump
On the left On the left, Cromer through one of its little alleyways, on the right the summit of Beeston Bump ; On the right On the left, Cromer through one of its little alleyways, on the right the summit of Beeston Bump

Images

Below are a selection of images taken from from the photo album for this walk. Feel free to browse through these or click on any image to view a larger version in the Gallery.

Click on an image below to view the Image Gallery

Maps

Below is the route depicted on the OpenStreetMap, Ordnance Survey Map and Google Map. Links to full page versions are found in the Essential Information

Summary of Document Changes

Last Updated: ... 2016-01-16

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